Questions? Call 215.842.0400

Software Awards

AwardAward

 

Promo

 

 

Signs of Academic Difficulty with Your Child

Thaddeus Falana M.ed - Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Signs of Academic Difficulty with Your Child


Often times, parents watch their child get pushed through grade levels without properly identifying the child’s learning gaps or seeking appropriate interventions from the child’s school or outside agencies such as One On One Tutoring Service, located in Philadelphia, PA . It is not unusual to find parents who have no idea what their child’s weaknesses are. The end result is that the child’s learning gaps continue to widen as he or she gets older, making it more difficult, expensive, and time consuming for interventions to be successful.


It is strongly recommended that parents assess their child at least twice a year, in the beginning of the school year and the end of the school year, in order to know where he or she stands in accordance to his grade level and age. Usually, schools have the ability to provide such testing; however, a wiser choice would be to allow an outside entity such as One On One Tutoring Service, to administer achievement tests that will identify not only your child’s instructional level in reading, writing, and mathematics, but also identify weak skills that may be affecting your child’s progress in the classroom. In addition to periodic testing, (Misunderstood Minds n.d.) suggests some signs to look out for if your child is struggling in reading, writing, or mathematics:


Reading and Comprehension
 trouble sounding out words and recognizing words out of context
 confusion between letters and the sounds they represent
 slow oral reading rate (reading word-by-word)
 reading without expression
 ignoring punctuation while reading
 confusion about the meaning of words and sentences
 inability to connect ideas in a passage
 omission of, or glossing over detail
 difficulty distinguishing significant information from minor details
 lack of concentration during reading
Writing
 difficulty getting started on writing assignments
 poor use of lines on the paper
 organizational problems
 uneven spacing between letters
 many misspelled words
 poor letter formation
 transposed letters and spelling omissions
 poor narrative sequencing
 lack of transitions
Not sure anyone will know what this reference is
 poor vocabulary
 many misspelled words
 frequent capitalization, punctuation, and grammar errors
 trouble generating ideas or elaborating on them
 difficulty developing and organizing ideas
 lack of opinion or sense of audience
 difficulty with writing tasks that require creativity and for critical thinking
Mathematics
 be unable to recall basic math facts, procedures, rules, or formulas
 be very slow to retrieve facts or pursue procedures
 have difficulties maintaining precision during mathematical work
 have difficulties with handwriting that slow down written work or make it hard to read later
 have difficulty remembering previously encountered patterns
 forget what he or she is doing in the middle of a math problem
 have difficulties sequencing multiple steps
 become entangled in multiple steps or elements of a problem
 lose appreciation of the final goal and over emphasize individual elements of a problem
 not be able to identify salient aspects of a mathematical situation, particularly in word problems or other problem solving situations where some information is not relevant
 be unable to appreciate the appropriateness or reasonableness of solutions generated
 have difficulty with the vocabulary of math
 be confused by language in word problems
 not know when irrelevant information is included or when information is given out of sequence
have trouble learning or recalling abstract terms
 have difficulty understanding directions
 have difficulty explaining and communicating about math, including asking and answering questions
 have difficulty reading texts to direct their own learning
 have difficulty remembering assigned values or definitions in specific problems
 be confused when learning multi-step procedures
 have trouble ordering the steps used to solve a problem
 feel overloaded when faced with a worksheet full of math exercises
 not be able to copy problems correctly
 may have difficulties reading the hands on an analog clock
 may have difficulties interpreting and manipulating geometric configurations
 may have difficulties appreciating changes in objects as they are moved in space
Can this list be made shorter



For More information on ways to help your child with their difficulties contact us:

www.one-on-onetutor.com

Helpful children educational tips.

Thaddeus Falana M.ed - Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Helpful children educational tips

Structure:

Have an after school schedule for your child. Your child should know exactly what he or she should be doing once school ends. This schedule should include homework, house chores, time for reading, time for dinner, as well as leisure time.


Support:

Regularly check student progress by meeting with teachers. Meeting with teachers during report card conferences and parent/teacher night is not sufficient. It does not have to be a face to face meeting. An easy way of communicating with teachers is via email. Obtain the email addresses of all of your child’s teachers and maintain communication through that avenue. Teachers show favor to students whose parents have a positive attitude and are proactive in their child’s education. In addition, parents must be aware of where their child stands in comparison to state and national averages.


Set High Standards:

Often, parents who give priority to activities such as sports, dance lessons, and music over education. The problem with that is the child will also prioritize things in the same manner. The child will become so consumed with these activities that it will affect his/her education negatively. Parents must be aware of this and establish education as the child’s first priority. In addition to setting education as the top priority, parents should never accept or ignore poor grades or bad behavior. Set high standards and never settle for less. Research shows that positive reinforcement through praise and encouragement works wonders as a motivational tool when a child succeeds, and an increase in involvement when a child fails is important in helping your child get better grades.

6 Year Old Can't Remember Letter Names

Thaddeus Falana M.ed - Thursday, July 14, 2011

From time to time, I like to tutor some of my students.  I think it is important for decision makers in education to be in the “front lines” so they can view education from the teacher’s perspective.  Yesterday, I tutored a 6 year old in reading.  I quickly noticed that after two months of instruction with his regular tutor, he was still unable to retain certain letter names and sounds.

 

I worked with him for an hour.  We spent the entire session yesterday working on the letter “F” which he previously spent a total of five hours working on with his regular instructor.  He completed a guided interactive lesson on the letter “F”; drew pictures of words beginning with the letter “F”; learned a song about the letter “F”; spent 15 minutes tracing the letter “F”.  However, after one hour of instruction on the same letter with two 5 minute breaks, he was unable to provide me the name of the letter. 

 

Obviously, I was a little distraught because this was my first experience working with a child that has such severe retention difficulty.  The majority of the remainder of my day was spent researching possible diagnosis for his learning difficulty and how to properly instruct him despite his hardships, since he did not have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) in place from his school.

 

What I found was that he may be exhibiting early signs of a form of Dyslexia as there are many forms under this spectrum.  This form of Dyslexia affects the brains ability to retain certain information.  My research suggested that extra time be spent on one concept, teaching in a variety of ways to target all learning modes. 

 

Based on my research, we modified his individual learning path to double the instructional time for each unknown letter, provide ample reinforcement at home with his mother, and continue teaching to the different modes of learning. 

 

We will continue to document his progress in future blogs.  If you are an educator or a parent with experience dealing with a student exhibiting the same characteristics mentioned in this blog, please feel free to chime in below.

6th Grader on a 10th Grade Math Level: The Importance Of Mastering Basic Skills

Thaddeus Falana M.ed - Thursday, June 23, 2011

Two days ago, I had the pleasure of administering an achievement test to a 6th grader who has been enrolled at One On One Tutoring Service since she was in the 3rd grade.  For privacy reasons, we will call the student Susan.  When Susan came to One On One Tutoring in the summer of 2008, she was in the 3rd grade and functioning on a 2nd grade math level.  We recommended that she complete 40 hours of instruction in which we targeted her learning gaps by using systematic, direct instruction in a one-to-one setting.  By the end of the summer, she was on a 3rd grade instructional level in mathematics.  Her mother enrolled her at One On One Tutoring Service every summer after that.  This summer, after grading her assessment in order for her to begin instruction, I was pleased to see her functioning on a 10th grade level even though she is currently in the 6th grade and going into the 7th.  It was evident by her test results that math no longer was a problem area for her.  The question is, how was she able to make such a remarkable leap in just three short summers?  Well, in order to answer the question, we must first understand the landscape of education today. 

When I was in school in the 80's and 90's, teachers made sure we mastered the basics in mathematics computation.  When I refer to "the basics" I mean addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.  I knew all of my multiplication facts in the 2nd grade.  I knew how to divide with one and two digit divisors in the 3rd grade and was able to understand and compute with fractions by the 6th grade.  By the time we moved into higher level mathematics, I was able to understand new material taught to me because I had already built a solid foundation.  I did not have to be retaught how to multiply, divide or work with fractions as is necessary to work with higher level math skills.  I was able to keep up with classroom instruction because the building blocks were already in place.

Fast forward to my adulthood as an educator.  I have worked with countless number of students in mathematics who are in junior high or high school trying to learn higher level math but are unable to because they never mastered basic skills.  Today, students in elementary school are allowed to use calculators.  No longer are students required to master basic computation skills before moving on to higher level math skills.  Studies show that there has been a steady decline in student gains in regards to computation skills since the 1980's.  Although many reasons contribute to this, it is important to understand the neccessity of mastering these basic skills early on in a student's elementary years.  Fact is, students who have not mastered basic whole number computation by the end of the 4th grade are more likely to struggle in mathematics. 

When Susan came to One On One Tutoring Service in the summer of 2008, I made sure that her learning path focused on building a solid foundation in her basic skills.  Although today's curriculum covers a broad range of math skills, we only focused on addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.  The same applied the following summer until she demonstrated mastery.  We then moved on to fractions, which she worked on until she demonstrated mastery, as she advanced in grade level.  By building a solid base, she was able to understand and apply newly taught math concepts in school without much frustration. 

According to (Loveless, 2003) and I agree wholeheartedly, basic skills are important because:

1.) Basic skills serve equity.  The black-white achievement gap expanded in every computation skill area in the 1990's as a result of a lack of focus on teaching basic skills.  When basic skills are not taught, the least privilaged in our society, those who cannot afford tutors, computer programs or academic summer camps, suffer.

2.) Basic skills are necessary to advance in math.  Basic skills are a floor, not a ceiling.  Students must learn arithmetic so that they can move on to more demanding mathematics.

3.) Basic skills predict adult earnings. Skills and knowledge students learn in school is correlated with success later in life.

In conclusion, it is imperative that parents understand the importance of a solid foundation not only in mathematics but in reading as well.  Unfortunately, the demand of today's curriculum does not allow adequate time for teachers to ensure that all students master their basic skills in mathematics.  Parents must realize that school is not the one and only solution to a child's education and that there are outside sources such as One On One Tutoring Service that will work diligently to make sure that their children are fully prepared to succeed in school.

Parents, GET INVOLVED!!!

Thaddeus Falana M.ed - Wednesday, June 15, 2011


I have always been a major advocate of parent involvement in their child’s education.  In my nine years in education, I have found that students with parents who are heavily invested in their education tend to have more success in school than students whose parents are less involved.   Case in point, I fielded a phone call from a parent who was trying to prepare her 7th grader for high school.  For privacy purposes, we will call the 7th grader Jane.  The parent was concerned about Jane’s results from the standardized test completed this spring.  The parent wanted to ensure that Jane was fully prepared to take the high school entrance exam in September so she reached out to One On One Tutoring Service for assistance. 


Upon reviewing her test scores, I found that Jane was above level in most skills.   Four learning paths were created to target the identified weak skills and close Jane’s learning gaps.  I emailed the mother and she responded back with a few suggestions to add to the learning path based on Jane’s learning style.   Although her suggestions were already included in the learning path which she overlooked, I was pleasantly surprised at how involved she was in Jane’s education.  Together, we were able to create a plan in a timely manner that was indubitably tailor-made to target Jane’s weaknesses.


The point I’m trying to make here is that parental involvement not only helps to make the educator’s job easier but it also prevents the child from falling behind.  By knowing where your child stands in accordance to national standards, parents have a greater chance of discovering problem areas and implementing a solution to address those problems.  A home that provides structure, support and sets high standards is sure to produce a successful student in school.  Below are a few ways in which parents can get involved:

 

Structure

Have an after school schedule for your child.  Your child should know exactly what he or she should be doing once school ends.  This schedule should include homework, house chores, time for reading, time for dinner, as well as leisure time. 

 

Support:

It is imperative that parents regularly check student progress by meeting with teachers.  Meeting with teachers during report card conferences and parent/teacher night is not sufficient.  It does not have to be a face to face meeting.  An easy way of communicating with teachers is via email.  Obtain the email addresses of all of your child’s teachers and maintain communication through that avenue.  Teachers show favor to students whose parents have a positive attitude and are proactive in their child’s education. In addition, parents must be aware of where their child stands in comparison to state and national averages. 

 

Set High Standards:

We live in a society where priority is often times given to the wrong areas in our children’s lives.  I have met with parents who give priority to activities such as sports, dance lessons, and music over education.  The problem with that is the child will also prioritize things in the same manner.  The child will become so consumed with these activities that it will affect his/her education negatively.  Parents must be aware of this and establish education as the child’s first priority.  In addition to setting education as the top priority, parents should never accept or ignore poor grades or bad behavior. Parents must set high standards and never settle for less.   Research shows that positive reinforcement through praise and encouragement works wonders as a motivational tool when a child succeeds, and an increase in involvement when a child fails is important in helping your child get better grades.

 

Remember parents, education begins at home.

How To Teach Multiplication Facts

Thaddeus Falana M.ed - Tuesday, June 07, 2011

How to teach multiplication facts

By: Thaddeus Falana, M.Ed

 

Many elementary and middle school students struggle with math because of their inability to recall multiplication facts.  It is imperative that students learn the multiplication tables as it is used in division, fractions and other higher level math skills.  If you are a parent and are looking to assist your child with his/her multiplication facts, here are a few steps to help you along the way:

 

Step 1

 

2

3

4

5

10

11

2 x 1

3 x 1

4 x 1

5 x 1

10 x 1

11 x 1

2 x 2

3 x 2

4 x 2

5 x 2

10 x 2

11 x 2

2 x 3

3 x 3

4 x 3

5 x 3

10 x 3

11 x 3

2 x 4

3 x 4

 

5 x 4

10 x 4

11 x 4

2 x 5

3 x 5

 

5 x 5

10 x 5

11 x 5

2 x 6

3 x 6

 

5 x 6

10 x 6

11 x 6

2 x 7

3 x 7

 

5 x 7

10 x 7

11 x 7

2 x 8

3 x 8

 

5 x 8

10 x 8

11 x 8

2 x 9

3 x 9

 

5 x 9

10 x 9

11 x 9

2 x 10

3 x 10

4 x 10

5 x 10

10 x 10

 

2 x 11

3 x 11

4 x 11

5 x 11

10 x 11

 

 

  • The 2’s table is fairly easy as one would need to learn how to count by 2’s. 
  • The 3’s are similar as well. Teach your child how to count by 3’s. 
  • Once your child knows how to count by 2’s and 3’s, drill him/her daily just on those facts.  Your child will learn how to quickly count by 2’s and 3’s until it is memorized.
  • Next, turn your attention to bottom half of the 2’s and 3’s.  Let your child know that any number multiplied by 10 is that number plus a zero.  i.e. 2 x 10 = 20, 3 x 10 = 30, 4 x 10 = 40, 10 x 10 = 100 etc.  In addition, any number up to 9 that is multiplied by 11 is that number written twice. i.e. 2 x 11 = 22, 3 x 11= 33, 4 x 11= 44, 9 x 11 = 99 etc.
  • Drill your child with flash cards everyday until facts are memorized.
  • Next, address the 4 times table.  Your child will already know 4 x1 through 4 x 4 because he/has already memorized the inverse of these facts.  i.e. 4 x1 = 1 x 4, 4 x 2 = 2 x 4, 4 x 3 = 3 x 4.  Your child will also have already master 4 x 10 as well as 4 x 11.
  • Again, drill your child with flash cards everyday until facts are memorized.
  • Move on to the 5 times table.  This step is easy as your child will need to learn how to count by 5’s.  The same technique used for the 2’s and 3’s will be used for the 5’s.
  • Again, drill your child with flash cards everyday until facts are memorized
  • The 10’s are also pretty simple as the rule states that any number multiplied by 10 is that number plus a zero.
  • The 11’s also follow a similar rule as any number up to 9 that is multiplied by 11 is that number written twice. i.e. 9 x 11 = 99, 8 x 11 = 88, 7 x 11 = 77 etc.
  • Again, drill your child with flash cards everyday until facts are memorized

 

Step 2

6

7

8

6 x 1

7 x 1

8 x 1

6 x 2

7 x 2

8 x 2

6 x 3

7 x 3

8 x 3

 

  • You will not have to spend much time on the above facts.  Your child will already have a good understanding as he/she should have already memorized through drilling, their inverses.  i.e. 6 x 1= 1 x 6, 6 x 2 = 2 x 6, 7 x 2 = 2 x 7, 8 x 3 = 3 x 8.
  • Again, drill your child with flash cards everyday until facts are memorized

 

Step 3

 

4

7

8

11

12

4 x 7

7 x 4

8 x 4

11 x 11

12 x 11

4 x 8

7 x 6

8 x 7

11 x 12

12 x 12

 

7 x 8

8 x 8

 

 

  • The above facts are the most challenging and will require rote memorization.  Drill using flashcards to help your child memorize the above.
  • Again, drill your child with flash cards everyday until facts are memorized

 

Step 4

6

7

8

6 x 5

7 x 5

8 x 5

 

  • The above follows the inverse rule of multiplication.  If your child has already memorized his/her 5’s table then the inverse of 6 x 5 = 5 x 6.  The same goes for 7 x 5 and 8 x 5.

 

Step 5

6 x 6

6 x 4

6 x 8

 

  • Above are math facts that rhyme. i.e. 6 x 6 = 36, 6 x 4 = 24, 6 x 8 = 48.
  • Again, drill your child with flash cards everyday until facts are memorized

 

Step 6

9 x 1

9 x 2

9 x 3

9 x 4

9 x 5

9 x 6

9 x 7

9 x 8

9 x 9

9 x 10

 

Use the following trick to teach the 9 times table:

  • Hold your hands in front of you with your fingers spread out
  • For 9 x 3 bend your third finger down. (9 x 4 would be the fourth finger etc.)
  • You have 2 fingers in front of the bent finger and 7 after the bent finger.
  • Therefore the answer must be 27.
  • This technique works for the 9 times tables up to 10.

 

Step 7

12 x 1

12 x 2

12 x 3

12 x 4

12 x 5

12 x 6

12 x 7

12 x 8

12 x 9

12 x 10

 

  • Your child should know all of his/her 11 times table by now.  If you know your 11’s, then any number up to 10 that is multiplied by 12 should be easy to figure out.  For example, if asked 12 x 9, then you should know that 12 x 9 = 9 x 12.  If 9 x 11 is 99, and we add 9 to 99, we should have our answer.  12 x 9 =  99 + 9 =  108.
  • Any number multiplied by 12 should be treated as such.  If you know the answer of that number multiplied by 11 then you should be able to add the factor to the product and get your answer.  i.e. What is 8 x 12?  Well, 8 x 11 = 88, therefore, 88 + 8 = 96, thus 8 x 12 = 96.

 

Again, drill your child with flash cards everyday until facts are memorized

 

It is recommended that parents purchase workbooks that offer ample worksheets for your child to use for practice.  Visit: www-one-on-onetutor.com and visit the bookstore which offers a wide array of student workbook.

Does Your Child Struggle With Reading?

Thaddeus Falana M.ed - Thursday, June 02, 2011

By : Thaddeus Falana, M.Ed

Most of us do not remember how we learned to read.  To many of us, reading is a seemingly simple task that we do on a daily basis without much thought.  However, for many Americans, learning to read is a tedious task that takes a lot of time, effort, and systematic instruction. 

As an educator of 9 years, I have come across many school-aged students and adults with serious reading difficulty.  Many, over the years, have developed their own method of reading words or getting by unnoticed by peers, parents, and teachers.  These readers often rely on context clues or the use of illustrations. 

As many of us know, reading is a means to help us understand the world in which we live and indubitably a skill required for success.  Because of this, it is imperative for parents of school-aged children to monitor the reading progress of their child(ren) by assessing them at least twice a year.  Schools, and outside agencies such as One On One Tutoring Service in Philadelphia,  are able to provide this assessment.

Reading can be broken up into the following components:

ü  Decoding

The act of systematically turning written words into spoken words by matching written letter or letter groups to oral sounds. 

 

ü  Comprehension

The ability to make meaning out of written words.

 

ü  Retention

Retaining or remembering what has been read

Struggling readers usually have difficulty with decoding.  A student who has difficulty with this skill will have trouble reading words that they are not familiar with.  Difficulty with this skill is often found in students between the ages of 5 and 11. 

Students who are able to decode known and unknown words but still struggle with reading are often weak in the areas of comprehension and retention.  These students have a difficult time understanding word meanings (vocabulary), inability to connect ideas in a passage, differentiating between significant and minor details or connecting what is read to personal experiences.  Difficulty with comprehension and retention are usually found in students between the ages of 7 and 17

If your child struggles with reading, it is recommended that you seek the advice and help of a professional.  Testing and instruction can be done at One On One Tutoring Service in Philadelphia, PA.

 

Signs of Academic Difficulty

Thaddeus Falana M.ed - Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Signs of Academic Difficulty

 

Often times, parents watch their child get pushed through grade levels without properly identifying the child’s learning gaps or seeking appropriate interventions from the child’s school or outside agencies such as One On One Tutoring Service, located in Philadelphia, PA .  I have met with countless parents who had no idea what their child’s weaknesses were.  The end result is that the child’s learning gaps continue to widen as he or she gets older making it more difficult, expensive, and a lot more time consuming for interventions to be successful.   It is strongly recommended that parents assess their child at least twice a year, in the beginning of the school year and the end of the school year, in order to know where he or she stands in accordance to his grade level and age.   Usually, schools have the ability to provide such testing, however, a wiser choice would be to allow an outside entity such as One On One Tutoring Service, to administer achievement tests that will identify not only your child’s instructional level in reading, writing, and mathematics, but also identify weak skills that may be affecting your child’s progress in the classroom.  In addition to periodic testing, (Misunderstood Minds n.d.) suggests some signs to look out for if your child is struggling in reading, writing, or mathematics:

Reading (decoding):

  • trouble sounding out words and recognizing words out of context
  • confusion between letters and the sounds they represent
  • slow oral reading rate (reading word-by-word)
  • reading without expression
  • ignoring punctuation while reading

Reading (comprehension):

  • confusion about the meaning of words and sentences
  • inability to connect ideas in a passage
  • omission of, or glossing over detail
  • difficulty distinguishing significant information from minor details
  • lack of concentration during reading

Writing:

  • difficulty getting started on writing assignments
  • poor use of lines on the paper
  • organizational problems
  • uneven spacing between letters
  • many misspelled words
  • poor letter formation
  • transposed letters and spelling omissions
  • poor narrative sequencing
  • lack of transitions
  • poor vocabulary
  • many misspelled words
  • frequent capitalization, punctuation, and grammar errors
  • trouble generating ideas or elaborating on them
  • difficulty developing and organizing ideas
  • lack of opinion or sense of audience
  • difficulty with writing tasks that require creativity and/or critical thinking

Mathematics

  • be unable to recall basic math facts, procedures, rules, or formulas
  • be very slow to retrieve facts or pursue procedures
  • have difficulties maintaining precision during mathematical work
  • have difficulties with handwriting that slow down written work or make it hard to read later
  • have difficulty remembering previously encountered patterns
  • forget what he or she is doing in the middle of a math problem
  • have difficulties sequencing multiple steps
  • become entangled in multiple steps or elements of a problem
  • lose appreciation of the final goal and over emphasize individual elements of a problem
  • not be able to identify salient aspects of a mathematical situation, particularly in word problems or other problem solving situations where some information is not relevant
  • be unable to appreciate the appropriateness or reasonableness of solutions generated
  • have difficulty with the vocabulary of math
  • be confused by language in word problems
  • not know when irrelevant information is included or when information is given out of sequence
  • have trouble learning or recalling abstract terms
  • have difficulty understanding directions
  • have difficulty explaining and communicating about math, including asking and answering questions
  • have difficulty reading texts to direct their own learning
  • have difficulty remembering assigned values or definitions in specific problems
  • be confused when learning multi-step procedures
  • have trouble ordering the steps used to solve a problem
  • feel overloaded when faced with a worksheet full of math exercises
  • not be able to copy problems correctly
  • may have difficulties reading the hands on an analog clock
  • may have difficulties interpreting and manipulating geometric configurations
  • may have difficulties appreciating changes in objects as they are moved in space

Misunderstood Minds. PBS.  n.d. Retrieved from: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/misunderstoodminds/intro.html

 

 

The importance of tutoring for school aged children

Thaddeus Falana M.ed - Tuesday, May 31, 2011

The importance of tutoring for school aged children

It is extremely important that parents are aware of the importance of tutoring for school aged children.   As the methods of delivering instruction change due to the advancement and incorporation of technology and as standardized testing becomes the new measure of success, one thing still remains, we still expect one teacher to effectively teach to a group of students.  Unfortunately, it is almost impossible for one teacher to provide the adequate amount of attention each and every student needs.   According to (Hams, 2006) childhood is a multistage process where early investments feed into later investments. Skill begets skill; learning begets learning.

 

 Effective tutoring offers the following benefits:


Individual instruction- A quiet child is more likely to open up and ask questions that they would normally refrain from in a large classroom setting.


Small group instruction- Students are more open to helping and learning from each other in a small group of about 3-5 students.  It also reassures other students that they are not the only ones in need of assistance.  In this type of setting, competition amongst students actually can help motivate others to want to achieve academic success.


Identifying learning problems- learning centers such as One On One Tutoring Service located in Philadelphia, PA offer testing that will pinpoint students learning problems which makes instruction much more effective as instructors are able to identify weaknesses and learning gaps thus effectively developing a plan to target and build upon weak skill areas.


Improved academic performance- systematic tutoring as offered by accredited learning centers like One On One Tutoring, and is based on student needs along with input from teachers can and will indubitably lead to overall academic performance.  By targeting academic weaknesses, instructors are able to fill learning gaps and the end result is improved performance in the classroom.

 

 

 

Harms, W. (2006). Enriching Education Throughout Childhood Pays Big Dividends For Disadvantaged. Retrieved from http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-11/uoc-eet111306.php

Compass Learning Website

Thaddeus Falana M.ed - Friday, May 13, 2011
Award-Winning Performance

CompassLearning Odyssey® delivers student achievement solutions that combine cutting-edge technology with current educational research and management tools. The result: award-winning software that excites and engages students and educators alike.

Continue Reading...

Back to Top


iconiconicon